Linux the Unrecognized Backbone of the Internet

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Linux is the unseen backbone of the Internet

This is one of those posts to inform the younger generation that Linux really does run everything. I was actually thinking the other day about the differences between Windows and Linux. The RAM\Memory differences are a point of note for one. Linux runs Supercomputers, social networking sites, TVs, and phones all with a smaller percentage of RAM it takes for a full equipped Windows Server. This post is not to bash Microsoft Windows at all, I’m far too grateful for one of their server capabilities over the years to do that.

This post is just to show the necessity of being familiar with Linux all the same. You see, Linux is the factory of the Internet, while Windows allows us to look inside and make requests of the factory, so to speak. Just kidding, you are aware Windows does more than that. However, in the instance of phones, the number of Linux type OS phones will exponentially approach a billion. By the end of this post, they probably have.

Either way, here is a list of terms you want to become familiar with as you seek out to learn Linux.

Kernel | Command line

Service | Boot loader | File systemLinux-Components

X Windows system | Desktop environment

Distribution

As you go through the steps to learn what each component is for, it gives you the ability to configure and create a Linux stable environment.

If you are one the individuals that started with Linux first, you know these things, but have you ever viewed the operating system in these components above. Experienced Linux user, most likely; younger ones, maybe not.

As you gathered from the title, Linux the Unrecognized Backbone of the Internet; it is titled as such because often people do not know just how many systems Linux is powering on the Internet.  The OS is free, it’s quiet, but make no mistake about it, it is powerful tool.

Hope this helps in some way.

Author

James Lynch

POCBOOKS.COM “If something you read changes your life, it becomes your reality.” The author of the Product of Culture Trilogy James is also an Information Technology Professional and Consultant "Whether a person is aware of it or not, like technology, everything has an answer. You can't be afraid to ask questions, You just may receive what you have been looking for!"

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2 Comments

  1. Networking Sarasota August 3, 2014 at 11:28 pm

    James,

    Very well written and completely agreed. The biggest issue I have with Linux is remembering the commands. I find the commands I need change with every distro. I think that is extremely important to tell that to the younger ones just starting. There are common commands but others such as apt-get or like commands change. Then dealing with the 1000’s of pieces of software without description and in some distros no search functionality means you need to know how everything for everything works in Linux and what software requires which version of dependency if you want to do anything serious with Linux.

    Googling anything you dont know is extremely difficult because what you find is typically not for your distro or not for your version and things have changed like setting up a simple DHCP server between CentOS and Ubuntu Server.

    Linux is not an easy OS to learn completely, if that’s possible. Now with that said I do a lot in Linux and program in it but it has taken me years of learning.

    Wayne Leiser, IT Director
    http://www.scrfix.com

    • James August 4, 2014 at 6:16 pm

      Hey Wayne, you are talking to someone who before the pretty flat screen monitor days would say, “print out the ‘man’ pages. I don’t care if it takes a team of paper.” Lol. Yes, DOS spoiled me. And I am by no means an expert with Linux. When Windows came out with “PowerShell” I started saying I am getting to old for this. Hence, Google is also my new “Man” pages.

      However, I desire to be on a level where I can remember the commands for all the major services at least for Linux.

      Wayne, thanks for sharing your valuable thoughts.

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